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God Bless Ernie Harwell


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Grew up in Michigan, listening to the Detroit Tiger ballgames with my dad.

I don't think my dad ever missed a game.

ah the memories

as an 'ignorant' little kid, wondering how the heck Ernie knew, when a fan caught a foul ball, that the person was from some obscure little town.

'complaining' because the color man in the booth was leaving peanut shells all over the scorecard

a strikeout was often "He stood there like the house by the side of the road and watched that one go by"

when the Tigers were behind, it was "Here comes Vince Desmond, the old run maker"

and his "back, back, back, its looooooonnnngggg gone" for a homer.

an excellent broadcaster, but more importantly, a good honest man!

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I believe he was the Orioles first announcer in '54.

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Well said, Tom, and for Ernie, well deserved.

I grew up listening to Earl Gillespie, so I know the great memories of announcers who focused on and really brought you into the games.

If it's an important (to me) game, I watch the TV and listen to the radio. Too often today's TV announcers are so lost in themselves that they forget there even is a game.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest Sieve

Let it be said that the radio announcers were true artists. Those of us who grew up with radios under our pillows--either because the games weren't all on TV in those days, or because our team was playing on the West coast and we were supposed to be in bed asleep on a school night--"saw" the game better than anyone watching on TV ever could. I can remember hearing Ernie at Tiger Stadium over all the transistor radios fans used to bring to the ballgame--they were there, watching the game in person, but they still needed Ernie to paint them a picture (and to know where the fans from Menonimee and Livonia and Royal Oak were sitting).

I unashamedly stood in tears at Ernie's coffin at Comerica Park a few days after his death, and then again a few days later during a brief pre-game ceremony when they raised a banner with his initials below the US flag. If you are a true fan of baseball, I have to believe that there was, at some point, a great radio announcer in your life who taught you to appreciate the game, its traditions and history, and all its nuances. For me, one of those announcers was Ernie Harwell.

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In many ways, we are fortunate to have a few announcers today who carry on the great traditions; at the top of my list are Joe Buck (clearly, today's "gold standard") and Joe Morgan.

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Let it be said that the radio announcers were true artists. Those of us who grew up with radios under our pillows--either because the games weren't all on TV in those days, or because our team was playing on the West coast and we were supposed to be in bed asleep on a school night--"saw" the game better than anyone watching on TV ever could.

If you are a true fan of baseball, I have to believe that there was, at some point, a great radio announcer in your life who taught you to appreciate the game, its traditions and history, and all its nuances. For me, one of those announcers was Ernie Harwell.

Larry,

I still remember sitting under the apple tree with my grandfather, transistor radio hanging from the swing supports, listening to Jimmy Dudley; great, sing-song voice of the Indians. Later, we'd hear Herb Score say "It's a beautiful day for baseball!" no matter the weather. On days when the Tribe wasn't playing, grandpa would tune-in WJR and Ernie. That was my introduction to the Tigahs. After I moved here, I was privileged to hear Ernie for many more years.

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Guest TomB

I don't really mean to start anything, especially on a thread for the late Ernie Harwell, but I thought that both of them were generally regarded as terrible announcers (at least around here). Anytime they are broadcasting a game I want to watch, I'll turn them down and listen to the radio.

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