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more useless info: Nov 13


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Sadie Hawkins Day

When: Always on November 13

Here is a holiday that originated from a cartoon. It all began in Al Capp's "Lil Abner Cartoon in the 1930's. In the cartoon series, the mayor of Dogpatch was desperate to marry off his ugly daughter. So he created Sadie Hawkin's Day. On this day, a race is held and all the single men were given a short head start. If a woman catches her man, he had to marry her.

Sadie Hawkins Day races and events grew in popularity during the course of All Capp's long running cartoon. This holiday (largely popular because of the cartoon) died out after 40 years when the cartoon was discontinued. It can occasionally be seen celebrated on college campuses.

......................

for those married men: how much of a head start were you given?

I guess for the ladies: how much of a head start did you give him?

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Tomf - I beg to differ...I believe Sadie Hawkins Day is February 13th, the day before Valentine's Day when the girls get to ask the guys out....

(At least that is the folklore from my growing up years) :lol:

EDIT: Tom - my bad, it did originate Nov 13th - but I did find the following to back up my fading memory from my youth. Our school always had a dance that day!!

"See also: Leap year for discussion of a similar tradition of "allowing" women to propose marriage on February 29, which has also become unofficially known as Sadie Hawkins Day."

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for those married men: how much of a head start were you given?

I must have been much faster than the ladies expected, since I never saw anyone in my rear view mirror. I pretty much had to do my own chasing. (No Lord Byron / Don Juan here.)

My recollection is the February 29 thing. Never heard of Sadie Hawkins Day's being on November 13 or February 13. Maybe there was no reason to tell me. :P

It's amazing what one can learn on these boards.

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I don't think there is a true Sadie Hawkins day. It's more of a concept.

Here's the wiki page:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadie_Hawkins_Day

It did start on 11/13 in Li'l Abner. The town bachelors would all line up and run. A bit later, the chosen spinster (Sadie, in the original instance) chases after the men. "Th' one she ketches'll be her husbin." Each year in Dogpatch it would continue. The strip would run a similar story in early November for a number of years.

But I don't think it's an "official" date. (no pun intended)

QKA, QPA, CPC, ERPA

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.

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Hey Tom, how do you mean "useless"?

This is important information.

:lol:

I'm a retirement actuary. Nothing about my comments is intended or should be construed as investment, tax, legal or accounting advice. Occasionally, but not all the time, it might be reasonable to interpret my comments as actuarial or consulting advice.

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It's more of a concept.

kinda reminds me of a favorite line from Pirates (emphasis added):

Elizabeth: Wait! You have to take me to shore. According to the Code of the Order of the Brethren...

Barbossa: First, your return to shore was not part of our negotiations nor our agreement so I must do nothing. And secondly, you must be a pirate for the pirate's code to apply and you're not.

And thirdly, the code is more what you'd call "guidelines" than actual rules.

Welcome aboard the Black Pearl, Miss Turner.

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I trust that this pirate was not speaking of the real Code (the one that we all know & love) . . .

I've seen some people in our business treat The Code as "more what you'd call 'guidelines' than actual rules."

QKA, QPA, CPC, ERPA

Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left.

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I've seen some people in our business treat The Code as "more what you'd call 'guidelines' than actual rules."

... and the filing of the 1040 as a "first offer".

I'm a retirement actuary. Nothing about my comments is intended or should be construed as investment, tax, legal or accounting advice. Occasionally, but not all the time, it might be reasonable to interpret my comments as actuarial or consulting advice.

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