BenefitsLink logo
EmployeeBenefitsJobs logo
Subscribe Now

“BenefitsLink continues to be the most valuable resource we have at the firm.”
-- An attorney subscriber
Featured Jobs
Benefit Manager (CA)
Salesperson - Internal TPA Plan Sales (ANY STATE, CT, DC, DE, MA, MD, ME, MI, NH, NJ, NY, OH, RI, VA)
Member Services Representative (DC)
Assistant Retirement Plan Administrator (NJ, PA)
Marketing Associate (CA)
ESOP Administrator (ANY STATE, VA)
Administrative Consultant for Qualified Retirement Plans (CA)
Retirement Plan Processor / Record-Keeper (TX)
Get the BenefitsLink appLinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook

BenefitsLink > Q&A Columns >

Who's the Employer?

Answers are provided by S. Derrin Watson

What's an Entity?

(Posted February 11, 2002)

Question 139: Doctor A is a 100% owner of his corporation. Doctor B buys 50% of the assets of the practice, moves into the office and starts to work. Dr. A still owns 100% of his (now smaller) practice. Dr. B owns 100% of his sole proprietorship (which is basically 50% of Dr A's former corp.) They set up as "Drs. A & B" on the door/biz cards/etc... but no legal entity (corp/partnership/LLP) titled "Drs. A & B" exists. Is this an ASG?

Answer: The question is whether there is a partnership or joint venture between the two of them. If there is, then clearly there is an affiliated service group. If there is not, then just as clearly there isn't an ASG because of lack of common ownership.

A formal legal relationship is certainly one of the hallmarks of a partnership, because one partner has the authority to bind the partnership and each is liable for the debts of the partnership.

Another touchstone, and this is critical for tax purposes, is that there be some sharing of income. In other words, there would be some stream of revenues in which both partners would share to some degree.

Based on what you've said, it doesn't sound like either of those elements exists here, which would lead one to the conclusion that a partnership does not exist as a separate entity.

However, it sounds as though they may be creating a perception in the mind of the public that a partnership exists. Having a single business, letterhead, etc. are certainly indications that there is a partnership. Moreover, it is likely that they are sharing some expenses, such as rent and utilities. You haven't mentioned whether they are sharing employees, but that would bring up another layer of complications. (For more details see Q&A 56 and Chapter 5 of my book, Who's the Employer?.

So, you've presented facts that could be interpretted either way. This is a really important issue, for more than just retirement purposes. If there's a partnership, or even a perception of a partnership, there can be very serious liability issues in the event of malpractice allegations. For this reason, I strongly suggest you have the arrangement reviewed by an business attorney familiar with partnership rules in your state as well as tax issues relating to partnerships. Issues relating to the status of entities are discussed in more detail in Chapter 1 of my book, Who's the Employer?.


Important notice:

Answers are provided as general guidance on the subjects covered in the question and are not provided as legal advice to the questioner or to readers. Any legal issues should be reviewed by your legal counsel to apply the law to the particular facts of this and similar situations.

The law in this area changes frequently. Answers are believed to be correct as of the posting dates shown. The completeness or accuracy of a particular answer may be affected by changes in the law (statutes, regulations, rulings, court decisions, etc.) that occur after the date on which a particular Q&A is posted.


Copyright 1999-2017 S. Derrin Watson
Related links:
 
About Us

Testimonials

Privacy Policy

Post a Job

Advertise in the BenefitsLink Newsletters

Add Your Company to the Directory of Vendors and Software

Submit a News Item, Press Release, Webcast or Conference

Contact Us

Payment Portal

© 2018 BenefitsLink.com, Inc.